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majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out, two new works, a book and a magazine cover story provide some very useful ways to think about it. the central debate between democrats and republicans is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book, catastrophic care, david goldhill makes the case for the market arguing that people need to become consumers of health care so that they, not insurance companies, not the government, actually see, feel and pay the bills. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals, to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries and television sets and computers. lasiks surgery which is not covered by health insurance, has seen a 90% drop in price and increase in quality since it was introduced in the 1990s. that's what happens when consumers pay for a product. makes an opposite case in a recent cover story in "time" m
of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of this. the central debate between republicans and democrats is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book catastrophic care, they make the case arguing people need ito become consumers of health care so they, not insurance companies or the government, actually see, feel and pay the bill. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries, tv sets or computers. and basic surgery has seen a 90% drop in price and increase in quality since it was introduced in the '90s. that's what happens when consumers pay for a product. steven makes the opposite case in a recover story in "time" magazine. he painstakingly went through the actual bills that hospitals put out and found they charge massively for routine procedures and
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2